• May 2009

    First of all: people who know that they don’t like oysters shouldn’t be surprised that when they eat an oyster, they don’t like it. Second of all: oysters wrapped in bacon don’t taste like bacon, they taste like oysters wrapped in bacon. And we might add that bacon-wrapped oysters are a deliciously rich and smokey […]

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    Geoduck Season

    May 26, 2009

    People always come into the retail store asking for geoduck, and we always disappoint. But not this weekend: today Dave and Jim spent a few hours out on the nether reaches of the tideflats, digging geoduck. We have 25 or so the ducks available to sell. The price is $10 a pound, and the clams […]

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    Several years ago Cait and John stopped by our farm and collected oyster shells, saying they were going to use them in their wedding at the nearby Alderbrook Resort. At the time we didn’t think anything of it, but now we think they’re geniuses. Turns out that they turned the oyster shells into keepsake wedding […]

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    State of the Oyster

    May 23, 2009

    The Nature Conservancy has just released the first ever report on the state of the world’s oyster populations. The prognosis is bad: 85% of the global oyster habitat has been destroyed by development, pollution, and destructive fishing practices. Read the report here. Short on time or attention span? Read a newspaper account of the report¬† […]

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    Trifecta! A Pacific oyster, a blood oyster (see earlier post), and a kumamoto. Like the Pacific, the kumamoto oyster (Crassostrea sikamea) originally hails from Japan. Some people think the kumo is a variety of Pacific (Crassostrea gigas) that evolved in isolated bays and estuaries. Kumos can’t reproduce in Puget Sound or Hood Canal because the […]

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    Mystery creature identified! Sort of. According to Jeff at the Seattle Aquarium, it looks like the body of a sea whip, but it may also be the body of a sea pen. But because the thing reminded us of a bull whip, and we have little more to go on, we’re going to call it […]

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    Dancing Abalone

    May 18, 2009

    Follow this link to a Seattle Times article about abalone in Puget Sound, complete with a video of the little creatures moving around.

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    Cousin Jesse pulled this thing up with his shrimp pot yesterday during the last day of the recreational shrimp season. It’s about 5 feet long, and is rigid at the base and flexible at the top, kind of like a bull whip. It’s slimy. It’s not vegetable, and it’s not man-made, and we have absolutely […]

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    Kids do the Darndest

    May 13, 2009

    On Monday a group of Bellevue Christian School students came by to tour the oyster farm. They were on the first day of a week long field trip around the Olympic Peninsula. We walked out on the tideflats to look at shore crab and clam trails, and then took a tour of the wet storage […]

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    sandworm fun

    May 5, 2009

    Sandworms (genus Nephtys) live in the mid-intertidal to deep-sea area. We found this worm while digging for littleneck clams at the edge of the Hama Hama delta. They are nocturnal predators, and use the proboscis to capture their prey: small worms, molluscs and crustaceans. They also evert the proboscis to create tunnels through the sand. […]

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    …and specifically, the joys of harvesting your own oysters and clams at Potlatch State Park. We probably couldn’t say it better: Moss-covered alders lean together over the roadway; the Olympic Mountains are mirrored in the glassy, cold water. The icy mountain runoff ushered by rivers into the brackish waters of the canal makes a prime […]

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