• September 2009

    Sand Dollar Convention

    September 28, 2009

    Sand dollars are very social animals.

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    Sneak Peeks

    September 24, 2009

    Evan finishing up the rockwork We moved the stained glass window from the old store into the new building Rich finishing off the sales counter Red.

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    Reverse Customer Service

    September 21, 2009

    The other day one of our customers dropped off some delicious Gravenstein apples and Italian plums, picked in Port Angeles.

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    Oyster Culture

    September 16, 2009

    Here are the oysters spawning earlier this summer: And now here are their babies! The black specks on this shell are miniature oysters, called spat. We’ll leave this cluster out on the beach for about 3 to 5 years so it can grow into a cluster of big guys. And then we’ll shuck em. And […]

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    How to Clean a Geoduck

    September 15, 2009

    Should you find yourself with a fresh geoduck on your hands, here’s what to do. 1. Cut the geoduck out of its shell. Be sure that you get all the tender meat off of the inside of the shell. 2. Remove shell and the guts. Notice the large round thing in the photo below? That’s […]

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    Oyster Farm Scenery

    September 11, 2009

    Photos by Martha.

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    Labor Day Lawnmower Races

    September 8, 2009

    Somewhere in Lilliwaup… httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hT3xi6aDbGU

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    Oyster Shell Paving

    September 4, 2009

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    We’ve never noticed before how colorful Olympia oyster shells are. They’re full of earth tones: browns, deep purples, and mossy greens. There are places on the farm where Olympias are abundant. They live on and amongst the larger Pacific oysters. These particular Olys had the misfortune to be attached to Pacific oysters that came up […]

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    Yes, but they shouldn’t. The AP reports that the Washington State Department of Health closed 400 acres of commercial shellfish beds on the Skokomish River (which drains the southern flanks of the Olympics) after they found human waste, left by recreational fishermen, in the bushes lining the riverbank. Apparently competition for fishing space was so […]

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