• Farm work

    We certainly hope so! Nathan found this shell out on the beach, completely COVERED in baby oysters from a spawn earlier this summer. Yay! This summer has been glorious… calm and warm… and the oysters are showing their appreciation. Let’s hope it keeps up!

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    Summer Fun

    July 13, 2013

    This week we gathered on the beach for a company potluck / going away party for our office manager Diana, who’s leaving us to return to Canadia. It was an evening of burgers, beers, oversized cards, fancy footwork, and swimming in jeans. We are REALLY going to miss Diana! The gifts: The group (or at […]

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    Tumbling farming is such a new technique that oyster farmers haven’t even settled on what jargon to use… some farms call their tumble bags “tumble bags,” others call their tumble bags “tipping bags.” (And if that didn’t strike you as a totally biased turn of phrase, then we’ve already got you hook, line, and sinker!) […]

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    Seaweed Farming

    March 14, 2013

    … accidentally. We’ve had a few daylight low tides so far this year, and once the sunlight hits the flats the algae starts growing like crazy on our clam nets. Seaweed is algae. And, just in case you might need it, here’s an idiot’s guide to algae: there’s microalgae, which is the kind that oysters […]

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    Daylight!

    January 17, 2013

    Today is an absolutely gorgeous day, fitting for one of the first daylight lows since the fall. All winter the guys have been going out on the flats in darkness, at all hours of the night, to pick oysters and dig clams. There are still a couple of strings of nighttime tides this year, so […]

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    Snow, before and after

    January 20, 2012

    Here’s (part of) what’s been going on here at Hama Hama. First, the river got invaded by a giant sea creature. We’re thinking it was a sea lion. He was an incredibly uncooperative photo-documentary subject and made a complete nuisance of himself: eating salmon, barking, and antagonizing the birds. He’s the giant brown blur in […]

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    2011 started on the rocky side, when we accidentally deleted all blog posts back to April Fool’s Day 2007, but we quickly recovered and ended up having a fantastic year, minus the truck theft. We bought a new truck, built a Flupsy, built a downweller, attended the first ever Meritage Oyster Fest in Saint Paul, […]

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    Clam Line

    November 7, 2011

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    On Halloween the Culinary Institute of America stopped by for some delicious treats, and one unexpected trick. The school visits almost every year while on a culinary tour of the West Coast. They first meet up with wild salmon activist Amy Grondin and folks from Long Live the Kings to learn about salmon restoration, and […]

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    Geoduck Day and Night

    October 28, 2011

    We’ve had geoduck babies in our downweller for about a month, and last night we took advantage of a really low tide (-3) to plant them out on the flats. The geoduck were growing in trays of sand, so the first step was washing them out of the sediment. As we know from experience, geoduck […]

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    Barge Observations

    October 25, 2011

    Today was a fantastic day for a barge ride. When it’s calm, you can really notice how clear the water is. The lack of algae makes Hood Canal¬† a relatively lean place to grow shellfish… but that’s o.k. because growing slow helps with oyster deliciousness, giving them a clean yet complex flavor. The beach crew […]

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    Today’s Discoveries

    October 21, 2011

    Tangy, crisp and delicious Chehalis apples, homemade clam chowder, and a beached ratfish, discovered by the night crew, now bopping around in the seed tanks waiting for the tide to come in.

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    All Shucking September

    September 6, 2011

    Well, we’re sorry to say that our oyster-growing region (which includes several very productive beaches in addition to our farm) has been shut down until October. Vibrio is a naturally-occurring salt water bacteria that proliferates when the Canal gets warm. If you eat an oyster raw, and if that oyster has just taken a big […]

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    summertime

    August 25, 2011

    Going to work with your dad is fun… provided you can swim all morning.

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    Flupsy and Dupsy

    August 19, 2011

    We’re hitting new milestones in our oyster husbandry abilities. This spring, we set up a Floating Upwelling System, which people in the industry call a Flupsy, as well as a downwelling system, which no one but us calls Dupsy. The Flupsy and Dupsy are pumping systems that continually move salt water through silos filled with […]

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